WHAT IS MY NOC CODE?National Occupational
Classification

Canada’s National Occupational Classification (NOC) provides a standardized framework for organizing the Canadian job market in a manageable, understandable and coherent system. It is the classification of occupations in the country’s labor market accepted by all federal and provincial government agencies. The NOC identifies and groups occupations primarily in terms of the work usually performed. This is determined by the tasks, duties, employment requirements and responsibilities of the occupation.

NOC – Ten Broad Occupational Categories.

0. Management Occupations *

These occupations are considered to be at the top of the organizational hierarchy of workplaces or businesses. Decision-making that affects the organization as a whole, or departments within organizations, is undertaken by management. As such, management is characterized by high levels of responsibility, accountability and subject matter expertise. Expertise is acquired through either formal education or extensive occupational experience.

The first digit of the code for all management occupations is 0. All management occupations are also included within skill level A.

Construction Jobs in Canada
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1. Business, Finance and Administration Occupations

This category contains occupations that are concerned with providing financial and business services, administrative and regulatory services and clerical supervision and support services. Some occupations in this category are unique to the financial and business service sectors; however, most are found in all industries.

This category contains both skilled and low skill occupations. Often, occupations at skill levels A and B are supplied from educational programs specific to the profession or occupation. Some occupations at skill level B are also supplied from experienced workers in related administrative support occupations.

2. Natural and Applied Sciences and Related occupations *

This category contains professional and technical occupations in the sciences, including physical and life sciences, engineering, architecture and information technology.

Occupations in this skill type category require post-secondary (college or university) education in an appropriate scientific discipline. Progression from occupations in skill level B to occupations in skill level A is usually dependent on completion of additional formal education.

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3. Health Occupations

This category includes occupations involved in providing health care services directly to patients and occupations that provide support to professional and technical staff.

This category contains both skilled and low skill occupations. Most occupations in this skill type category require post-secondary education in a related health care program. Progression from occupations in skill level B to occupations in skill level A is usually dependent on the completion of additional formal education. Occupations in skill level C require short training programs.

4. Occupations in Education, Law and Social, Community and Government services*

This skill type category includes a range of occupations that are concerned with law, teaching, counseling, conducting social science research, developing government policy, and administering government and other programs.

Occupations in this skill type category usually require completion of a related post-secondary program. Progression from occupations in skill level B to occupations in skill level A is not usually possible without completion of additional formal education.

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5. Occupations in Art, Culture, Recreation and Sport*

This skill type category includes professional and technical occupations related to art and culture, including the performing arts, film and video, broadcasting, journalism, writing, creative design, libraries and museums. It also includes occupations in recreation and sport.

This category is characterized by occupations which are linked by subject matter to formal post-secondary educational programs but which have, for the most part, a range of acceptable qualifications. Occupations in this category are also characterized by a requirement for creative talent, such as for designers and performers, or for athletic ability. Unit groups for occupations that usually require university graduation in a professional discipline, such as journalism or library science, have been classified in skill level A. Most others have been classified in skill level B in recognition of the wide range of entry routes that are possible.

6. Sales and Service Occupations

This skill type category contains sales occupations, personal and protective service occupations and occupations related to the hospitality and tourism industries.

This category contains both skilled and low skill occupations. Occupations in skill level B of this category can be linked, for the most part, to formal post-secondary or occupation-specific training programs. Others are characterized by periods of formal on-the-job training other than apprenticeship. Progression from occupations in skill level C or D to those in skill level B usually require completion of related training programs. Some progression through experience is possible for supervisory positions.

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7. Trades, Transport, and Equipment Operators and Related Occupations

This skill type category includes construction and mechanical trades, trades supervisors and contractors and operators of transportation and heavy equipment. These occupations are found in a wide range of industrial sectors, with many occurring in the construction and transportation industries.

This category contains both skilled and low skill occupations and includes most of the apprenticeable trades, including all of those related to the construction industry. Other occupations in this category usually require completion of college or other programs combined with on-the-job training. Progression to supervisory or self-employed contractor status is possible with experience. There is limited mobility or transferability of skills among occupations in this category due to specific apprenticeship, training and licensing requirements for most occupations.

8. Natural Resources, Agriculture and Related Production Occupations

This category contains supervisory and equipment operation occupations in the natural resource-based sectors of mining, oil and gas production, forestry and logging, agriculture, horticulture, and fishing. Most occupations in this category are industry-specific and do not occur outside of the primary industries.

This category contains both skilled and low skill occupations. Occupations within skill level B of this category generally require completion of college or other post-secondary training programs. Some, however, are characterized by industry-based training and progression through experience.

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9. Occupations in Manufacturing and Utilities

This category contains supervisory and production occupations in manufacturing, processing, and utilities.

Occupations in this category are characterized by internal progression and on-the-job training.

This category contains both skilled and low skill occupations. Workers typically start out in these occupations at entry-level positions and progress to increasingly higher skilled occupations through experience. Mobility between employers or industries may be limited by seniority provisions of collective agreements. The occupations in skill level B of this category are increasingly technical in nature and post-secondary training programs are required for some.

* These categories contain skilled occupations only.

What is my NOC?

It is often helpful to compare and contrast several different NOCs before concluding which particular code applies best on your experience. Each NOC code is made up of several elements:

1. The Lead Statement
2. Example Titles (alternate titles for the occupation)
3. Main Duties (full expansion of duties)
4. Employment Requirements (education, experience and licensing requirements to work in the occupation in Canada)
5. Additional Information (if applicable)
6. Classified Elsewhere (similar occupations listed elsewhere in the NOC)

If your experience appears to fall under a number of different NOC codes, it is best to list them all for the officer to assess. Ask Vimrox for help in determining your NOCs.

Am I High-Skilled or Low-Skilled?

If your NOC starts with a “0” (i.e., you belong to a Management Occupation) you are considered as skilled (skill level A). If your NOC does not starts with a “0” (i.e., you belong to a non-Management Occupations), then look at the second digit. If the second digit of your NOC is 1, 2 or 3 your occupation is considered skilled (skill Level “A” or “B”). If the second digit of your NOC is 4 or higher, you fall under low skill occupations (skill Levels “C” and “D”).

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